Lead Poison Information
PROGRAM AREAS

Campgrounds


Children's Camps


Clean Indoor Act


ATUPA (Adolescent Tobacco Underage Prevention Act


Food Service Establishments


Mobile Home Parks


Public Water Supplies


Rabies/Animal Bites


Residential Lead Paint Assessments


Realty Subdivision Review


Individual
Septic System Plan
Reviews and Technical Assistance


Public Swimming
Pools and Bathing Beaches


Tanning Facilities


Tattoo and Body Art


Temporary Residences Hotel, Motel


Environmental
Health Services
Seneca County Health Building
31 Thurber Drive
Waterloo, NY 13165
Phone: (315) 539-1945
Fax: (315) 539-4745

Hours of Operation:
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Director:
Vickie Swinehart
315-539-1925
vswinehart@co.seneca.ny.us

Principal Sanitarian:
Thomas E. Scoles
315-539-1947
tscoles@co.seneca.ny.us

Public Health Sanitarian:
Julie Hoster
315-539-1764
jhoster@co.seneca.ny.us

Public Health Sanitarian:
A. J. Sinicropi
315-539-1951
asinicropi@co.seneca.ny.us

Public Health Sanitarian:
Melissa Brand
315-539-1948
mbrand@co.seneca.ny.us

Contact:

Staff Resource Assistant
Jennifer Bates
315-539-1945
jbates@co.seneca.ny.us

Environmental Health Services

The Seneca County Department of Health enforces laws and regulations which protect the health and safety of all community members.

* October 25, 2014 Seneca County
Hazardous Waste Drop Off Day *


2014 MOSQUITO INFORMATION

Mosquitoes and Disease

Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Fight The Bite Poster


HELP STOP THE SPREAD OF THE STOMACH BUG!

VIDEO: Local Health Problems in a War Torn Area: Seneca County


Blue-Green Algae


TICKS AND LYME DISEASE

Ticks and Lyme Disease Bite - A Guide for Preventing Lyme Disease

Tickborne Diseases of the United States

Dress to Repel!

Lyme Disease and Pets

Lyme disease is not limited to humans. Veterinarians have reported Lyme in both dogs and cats. Just as with humans, it is important for animals to avoid tick bites and receive prompt treatment for Lyme disease.

Tick Bite Prevention

  • Check your pet regularly for ticks, especially after any trips through grassy or wooded areas. Comb through your pet's hair thoroughly.

  • If you find a find a tick, remove it promptly.

  • Consult your veterinarian about treating your dog or cat with tick-killing
    pesticides (acaricides) or using tick collars. There are many pesticides
    aimed at preventing tick bites, but some people and animals may be sensitive
    to the chemicals they contain.

  • When walking or exercising your pet outdoors, try to keep it away from grassy or wooded areas and leafy debris

  • There is currently a Lyme disease vaccine available for dogs. However, there are varying opinions on its effectiveness. Consult your veterinarian about the vaccine.

  • If you find several ticks on your dog, you may wish to discuss an insecticidal bath with your veterinarian or groomer.

Symptoms of Lyme Disease in Pets

Symptoms of Lyme disease in animals are similar to the symptoms in humans. Although you will not see a skin rash on your pet, they can experience a range of symptoms:

  • In dogs: Some infected dogs do not experience any symptoms of Lyme disease. Symptoms include lethargy, arthritis (displayed as joint pain, shifting from foot to foot, and lameness), fever, fatigue, and kidney damage. Symptoms can become chronic.

  • In cats: While there is some debate about whether cats suffer from Lyme disease, cats are thought to be highly resistant to the disease.

Treatment of Lyme Disease in Pets

As with humans, animals are generally treated for Lyme disease with certain antibiotics. However, you should consult your veterinarian about proper treatment of your pet.

Questions or Comments

Send an email to bcdc@health.state.ny.us